Sabah & Sarawak will benefit tremendously from English
Posted by page-azimah on December 22 2015 16:34:01
Parent groups want other states to adopt Sarawak’s English policy
BY AIZYL AZLEE
Sunday November 22, 2015

“It is very positive. I believe Sabah and Sarawak have the provisions to allow English for official matters, and this is the time for them to flex their muscles as far as English is concerned,” Noor Azimah said.

“So when the (DLP) is implemented, we would see people in Sabah and Sarawak excelling in employability because of their English proficiency.”
Extended News
Parent groups want other states to adopt Sarawak’s English policy

BY AIZYL AZLEE

Sunday November 22, 2015
07:09 AM GMT+8
ICYMI

A group of pupils in their classroom at one of Malaysia’s many vernacular schools.A group of pupils in their classroom at one of Malaysia’s many vernacular schools.

KUALA LUMPUR, Nov 22 — Parent education groups here applauded the Sarawak government for making English an official language along with Bahasa Malaysia, saying they hope the rest of the country will embrace more decisions aimed at improving English proficiency.

Malacca Action Group for Parents in Education chairman Mak Chee Kin said it was a step in the right direction by the Sarawak government, although the decision may make the administration unpopular.

“There will be people complaining about it but English is the language of commerce and IT. We cannot deny the importance of it,” he told Malay Mail Online.

He said he completely disagreed with claims by some parties that the move may end up alienating the rural folk, saying instead that if Malaysians could be fluent in more languages, it could close the gaps between the country’s different racial communities.

“It isn’t even made compulsory, it is in addition to the national language, not replacing it. So those who feel uncomfortable don’t even have to speak it,” he pointed out.

“But even if they don’t speak it, they would be exposed to it, and just exposing people to English would make it less intimidating to non-speakers.”

Parent Action Group for Education Malaysia president Datin Noor Azimah Abdul Rahim agreed with Mak, adding that the move was even in line with the federal government’s intention to improve English proficiency via a dual language programme (DLP) currently in a pilot phase.

Under the programme, selected schools will be given the option to teach Science and Mathematics in English or Bahasa Malaysia to Year One and Year Four pupils.

“It is very positive. I believe Sabah and Sarawak have the provisions to allow English for official matters, and this is the time for them to flex their muscles as far as English is concerned,” Noor Azimah said.

“So when the (DLP) is implemented, we would see people in Sabah and Sarawak excelling in employability because of their English proficiency.”

Sarawak Chief Minister Tan Sri Adenan Satem had on Wednesday said that Sarawak has adopted English as the administration’s official language, which effectively allows correspondence between state departments to take place in English.

He cited the need for better English amongst civil servants, calling the move “practical and logical”.

Two Malay business groups here warned the state, however, that such a policy could end up widening the social class divide.

They also questioned the rationale behind what they believe to be an unnecessary move, and warned that it could create unnecessary discomfort among the rural folk who they said converse more fluently in Bahasa Malaysia, the national language.
- See more at: http://www.themalaymailonline.com/malaysia/article/parent-groups-want-other-states-to-adopt-sarawaks-english-policy#sthash.KL7mfoCK.dpuf

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