PT3 an opportunity for students to shine
Posted by page-azimah on December 31 2015 22:24:28
Home > Opinion > Letters
Thursday, 17 December 2015
PT3 more challenging

THE announcement of the Pentaksiran Tingkatan 3’s (PT3) results on Monday has revealed more than just the achievements of the candidates and the schools performance. More importantly, it helps parents, teachers, policy makers, researchers and the society measure the effectiveness of the revised and improvised version of Penilaian Menengah Rendah (PMR) – a public examination that many thought was more relevant than the PT3.

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Home > Opinion > Letters

Thursday, 17 December 2015
PT3 more challenging

THE announcement of the Pentaksiran Tingkatan 3’s (PT3) results on Monday has revealed more than just the achievements of the candidates and the schools performance. More importantly, it helps parents, teachers, policy makers, researchers and the society measure the effectiveness of the revised and improvised version of Penilaian Menengah Rendah (PMR) – a public examination that many thought was more relevant than the PT3.

Hence, while we are putting students with extraordinary achievements or inspiring stories of life in the limelight by highlighting their success on television, tabloid, social media and in the newspapers, we need, at the same time to discuss and carry out a post-mortem at school, district, state and national levels to identify strengths and weaknesses of the PT3.

When the PT3 was first implemented, some were doubtful of its validity and reliability as the new system applied the concept of a school-based assessment.

In addition, for certain subjects, there were several sets of questions from which schools could choose while both invigilators and examiners came from the same school where the candidates studied.

These new changes failed to convince some people that the PT3 is a more effective way to measure students’ competency and ability in mastering all subjects.

However, I believe that many parents and teachers have begun to understand this still new education system following its second year of implementation. There may be fewer candidates scoring straight As in the PT3 compared to the PMR, but quantity does not determine quality.

The inclusion of higher-order thinking skills questions challenge the students’ ability to think creatively, critically and logically while the fact that language papers were split into two helped candidates to strive to improve their listening, speaking and writing skills in their effort to be multilingual users with excellent proficiency.

The PT3 may be harder to score but we need to realise that this difficulty creates opportunities for students to shine. It also promises greater satisfaction when their blood, sweat and tears pay off as they accomplish their goals.

Congratulations to all candidates. To the high achievers, this success should be a motivation for you to work smarter and harder. To those who failed to reach the target, there is no use crying over spilt milk. There is always tomorrow and room for improvement.

MUHAMAD SOLAHUDIN RAMLI

Marang

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